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Gallery: Brawn and beauty of Americans at Classic Car Sunday

31st July 2021
Ben Miles

American cars are big and brutal… well, if you think that’s true today, wait until you see the cars the USA turned out in the past.

But, while the cars of American history are undeniably large. Many of them actually come with more grace that brutality when you take a second look.

Take, for example, giants like the Cheverolet Bel Air, a car which takes up a decent amount of the paddocks at Goodwood, but which if you take a moment to look at it actually a very refined and  full of incredible details.

Then there are the proper muscle or pony cars of the middle 20th century, all of which are fitted with honking V8 engines, but all of which have design merit of their own. From Mustang to Pontiac, Galaxie to Falcon, there’s something to love about each of these American beasts.

A look at the American cars that arrived for Classic Car Sunday should be enough to prove to you that, even though American cars are muscular and large, they aren’t just big brutes.

Photography by Joe Harding.

  • Classic Car Sunday

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  • 2020